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weeds that spray seeds

Weeds that spray seeds

Mowing will achieve control over time. Do it frequently enough that you remove the flower heads before they become seed pods.

The weed prefers cool, moist soil and is most prolific after early spring rains. The weeds spread quickly but their appearance reduces as temperatures increase. The plant has a long, deep taproot, which makes pulling them out manually ineffective. Control for hairy bittercress is cultural and chemical.

Hairy bittercress weed (Cardamine hirsuta) is an annual spring or winter pest. The plant springs from a basal rosette and bears 3 to 9 inch (8-23 cm.) long stems. The leaves are alternate and slightly scalloped with the largest at the base of the plant. Tiny white flowers develop at the ends of the stems and then turn into long seedpods. These pods split open explosively when ripe and fling seeds out into the environment.

Cultural Control for Hairy Bittercress

Late winter and spring signal growth of all plants, but especially weeds. Annual weed seeds overwinter and then burst into growth towards the end of the season. Hairy bittercress weed is no exception. What is hairy bittercress? The plant is an annual weed, which is one of the earliest to sprout and form seeds. Control for hairy bittercress starts early in the season, before flowers turn to seed and get a chance to spread.

This pesky weed is small enough to hide among your landscape plants. Its extensive seed expulsion means that just one or two weeds can spread quickly through the garden in spring. Early control for hairy bittergrass is essential to protect the rest of the landscape from an infestation.

As temperatures get warmer, the plant will die naturally without having reproduced. That means fewer weeds the following season.

What is Hairy Bittercress?

Severe infestations of hairy bittercress weed will require chemical treatment. Herbicides applied post emergence need to have two different active ingredients. The ingredients must be 2-4 D, triclopyr, clopyralid, dicamba, or MCPP. These are found in broadleaf herbicide preparations known as two, three, or four-way treatments.

Prevent invasions into turf areas by encouraging good grass growth. The weeds easily infest thin or patchy areas. Apply several inches (8 cm.) of mulch around landscape plants to help prevent seeds from getting a foothold in your soil.

Weeds that spray seeds

After seeding, you’ll then need to wait the appropriate amount of time before arranging for pre-emergent weed spraying. While you wait to spray for weeds, this might be a good time for fertilizing or soil treatments.

Certain types of weed spray allow for seeding to occur as soon as the next day. Other types may require you to wait a few weeks.

If your lawn has a large number of weeds, then it might be in your best interest to tackle them first and worry about seeding later. This is especially true if you have a little time left in the primary grass sprouting season.

Analyze the Current State of the Landscaping

Certain weed varieties thrive during the winter. Mediterranean grass is an annual grassy type of weed that is commonly found in Arizona. Winter weeds often show up as patches of tall green grass among a sea of brown desirable grass blades that have done dormant.

Once the weeds die off, remove the dead plants, and consider dethatching the lawn. Then, apply the seed using the recommended application method and water thoroughly to ensure it sprouts.

Why Skipping Spraying Won’t Work

Post-emergent weed sprays are less likely to disrupt seed germination and grass growth. Selective sprays that target broadleaf weeds are also safer to use since they don’t affect the grass.

Lawn maintenance plans are based upon what type of plants are growing on your property along with the current season.