Posted on

is marijuana easy to grow

Is marijuana easy to grow

Sour OG is a great strain for beginners looking to grow something a little different. This OG Kush and Sour Diesel cross has a complex mix of scents—skunk, spice, and of course fuel, with some hints of pine and lemon.

And to make things even easier, you may want to check out feminized or autoflower versions of them—feminized seeds don’t need to be sexed out to identify and get rid of pesky male plants; with autoflowers, you don’t have to worry about light changing, and you can harvest plants 2-3 months after seeds sprout.

Growing weed is pretty easy, but some strains can be trickier to grow than others. Some are delicate and need a lot of attention or are prone to disease or mold, while others are sturdy and can handle missing a watering for a day or two. Also, certain strains have adapted to specific climates, so it might not make sense to grow one suited to warm weather if you live in a cold place.

This strain can handle many climates, both indoors and outdoors, but it can take a long time to flower—more like nine or ten weeks. Regardless, GMO Cookies is a new standard that packs a punch and brings some great savory scents to your garden.

GMO Cookies

So here are five strains that are easy to grow for beginners: they grow strong, yield high, can grow in many different climates, and have a forgiving margin of error.

A relative newcomer to the strain world, Wedding Cake is a Cookies cross that launched a whole new family of cake strains, such as Ice Cream Cake, LA Kush Cake, Cake Batter, and so much more.

Another relatively new strain, GMO Cookies will smell like nothing you’ve ever grown before—its nickname is “Garlic Cookies.” Crossing two classic strains, GSC and Chemdog, GMO has dense, sticky, light green buds with orange hairs and is a high yielder. Its trichome levels make it a good one for pressing your own hash.

Blue Dream

Its indica-dominant genetics means it usually grows short and stout, but it still gets solid yields and has dense buds. You’ll want to be sure to prune and top Wedding Cake to get rid of some of its foliage, for fear of it developing mold. This frosty strain is covered in trichomes and will be a sticky one in your garden, but its sweet citrusy smells with hints of vanilla make it a pleasure to grow.

This cross of legendary Super Silver Haze and Lemon Skunk will definitely bring some lemon scents to your garden. Super Lemon Haze has some strong sativa in its genetics, so it likes slightly warmer climates with a little more humidity, but it is still versatile and can thrive in most places.

Is marijuana easy to grow

Though the 12-hour interval is fairly universal, knowing exactly when to induce flowering is less clear. For the home grower, it usually comes down to space; the longer one waits to trigger the flowering cycle, the taller their plant will be. A good rule of thumb: cannabis will only continue to grow 30 to 50 percent once the light source is reduced. If the plant is growing in a closet, growers should trigger the flowering cycle, understanding that there must be more than two feet of space between the canopy of the plant throughout the entirety of its life.

Light: 2,200k. “For a closet set up, I would recommend a 175-watt HPS light,” Lipton said. “Some people try to use fluorescent lighting, but I wouldn’t recommend that. You’re just not going to get a very good outcome. Nowadays, HPS lights can just go right into your home outlet, and you’d just need a timer [to set the intervals]. Position the light directly overhead. They can be pretty powerful, so you’re going to want it at least two feet from the top of the canopy [to prevent the plant from overheating].”

Relative humidity: 30 to 45 percent. “If you live somewhere humid, you’re probably going to want to buy a dehumidifier,” said Lipton. “In Boulder, we sometimes have to add humidity.” At home, that can be done with a reliable humidifier.

Even with a healthy clone, however, cultivating cannabis can be a long and arduous process — especially in tight indoor spaces. “A lot of people think growing is easy, but it’s not,” Lipton said. “You have to be really on it. Not everyone has success, obviously.”

Trigger the flowering cycle.

To harvest, many growers begin by removing the leaves of the cannabis plant with trim scissors, followed by the buds (using pruners). “We call this bucking,” Lipton said. “Gloves are also extremely important for sanitation reasons as well as to keep your hands from becoming sticky with the resin from the plant.”

Temperature: 68 to 78 degrees Fahrenheit. “A tool you should always have is a little temperature gauge,” Lipton said. “They call them hygrometers. They’re cheap and tell you both the temperature and the humidity.”

Cannabis plants yield the highest-quality (and quantity) flowers after maturing. This usually takes about a month to happen. “I recommend planting in a five-gallon Home Depot bucket,” Lipton said. “It’s really important to have proper drainage, so you want to drill some holes in the bottom. The biggest mistake people make is that they overwater and suffocate the roots. Cannabis likes to be watered and dried out before it’s watered again.” During the vegetative cycle, the plant should be exposed to a minimum of 18 hours of light. Remember to open the closet door while the lights are on to prevent the space from heading north of 78 degrees Fahrenheit.

Plant and maintain the vegetative cycle until the plant is mature.

Despite the hurdles, many first-time growers still choose to cultivate cannabis indoors (which is legal in Alaska, Colorado, Washington D.C. and Oregon), and there are steps to maximize a plant’s chances of succeeding. It all starts with a plant’s genetics. “For your typical closet setup, you’re going to want a plant that stays short,” Lipton said. “A lot of time that means an indica. Sativas are really tall and lanky.” (More on the difference between those two families here.)

pH of Water: 6.3 to 6.7. “You’ll need a meter that you can stick into your water and tell you the pH,” Lipton said. “You want something between 6.3 to 6.7 pH for watering your plants. That sounds like pretty sophisticated stuff but it’s really not. A lot of times your tap water will be 7.8. You can use what they call pH down. That’s a crucial step.”