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how to grow weed outdoors in pots

How to grow weed outdoors in pots

Autoflowering plants are ready to harvest on their own schedule as determined by the breeder.

Photoperiod strains

Make sure photoperiod plants don’t get light at night. A privacy fence or a hedge will block street lights pollution enough. No direct bright light at night is the ticket!

Watering can

5.) Plant care

There’s a worm in there, that’s what this leaf tells me… Now I must remove the whole bud.

A private, secluded area with plenty of sunlight is perfect for growing cannabis. Make sure you have access to water!

That’s it! A quick and dirty tutorial that will get you all the way to your first outdoor cannabis harvest!

2.) Set up your containers with soil

Follow these steps and you will be harvesting your plants in a few months:

How to Dry and Cure Buds

How to grow weed outdoors in pots

The three primary nutrients required for cultivating marijuana are nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium.

Greenhouse structures range from inexpensive polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes, often called “hoop houses,” to highly engineered, fully automated, and purpose-built steel greenhouses. Due to their efficiency, greenhouses are quickly becoming the preferred growing method for many large-scale cultivators.

To grow cannabis outdoors, the bare minimum required is basic gardening tools, soil, water, and a spot in your backyard that receives ample sunlight.

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In the Northern Hemisphere, cannabis can be planted in early to mid-spring and harvested in mid-fall, depending on the cultivar. In the Southern Hemisphere, the growing season will be reversed with planting in early to mid-fall and harvesting in the middle of spring.

Determining the optimum location is another important factor that can affect the yield and quality of your plants. Cultivators in the Northern Hemisphere should attempt to place their plants in an area with southern exposure to ensure their plants are getting the most available sunlight. The opposite is true for the Southern Hemisphere.

Security

If you decide to use seeds, make sure you start them about a month before you would typically start clones to give them time to germinate and adequately develop their taproot.

Depending on your location, you may need to plan for rain. In most regions, the rainy season is typically aligned with the end of the flowering stage and the start of the harvesting period, but this may not always be the case. Rain can be detrimental to an outdoor flowering crop so being prepared to cover or move plants can help ensure a successful harvest. If it does rain on your plants, make sure to immediately shake off any excess water, as lingering moisture can lead to the formation of mold and nobody likes moldy weed.