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growing one cannabis plant indoors

Growing one cannabis plant indoors

On May 8, I hacked the branches from the stalk and felt a sharp pang of sadness. After that came a flurry of activities that included drying the branches upside down (using coat hangers, binder clips and a rolling clothes rack), then trimming the buds and finally curing them in an airtight container. (Final yield at this point: 26 grams — just short of an ounce.) According to Taylor’s email, it’s this last part — the curing — that brings out flavor, eliminates the chlorophyll and makes for a smoother smoke. The recommendation was to cure the herb two to eight weeks. Taylor noted that some folks prefer the go-slow approach and will cure their bud for up to six months.

In addition to having a hand in bringing eggs, bacon, chicken and milk to the table, my siblings and I saw how wool becomes yarn. We learned how to make rhubarb wine (the first kid down the stairs in the morning usually gave the crock full of fermenting fruit a good stir), how to bake bread on a wood stove (the Dutch oven came in clutch) and how to turn the sap from the trees around us into maple syrup. In short, we were doing farm-to-table before farm-to-table was even a thing, and it gave me a keen appreciation of the effort that goes into things that I otherwise would have taken for granted.

For almost as long as I’ve known about the cannabis plant, I’ve wanted to grow my own weed. This is partly because I like everything about it; not just the psychoactive effect of combusting and inhaling it, but also the way it looks, from the slender serrated fan leaves to the densely packed flowers shimmering with a crystal-like dusting (called trichomes, these tiny, hair-like structures are home to the high-producing compound THC). I like the skunky smell of a live plant, and I appreciate the fact that it’s only the female of the genus that will get you high.

In the run-up to 4/20, a look at some of the ways Southern California is shaping the cannabis conversation.

If you’re wondering why on God’s green earth anyone blessed with the SoCal sunlight would choose to grow a cannabis plant indoors — and shell out money for a light to do it to boot — it’s worth a slight detour here to give you the straight dope on growing your own dope in the state of California (and, by extension, Los Angeles, because the city doesn’t have its own regulations addressing personal cultivation).

And there’s one last tiny hitch in the homegrown giddyap — and one that’s of particular importance in a city like L.A. where most of us live cheek by jowl: any plants you’re growing must be in a locked space that is not visible to the public.

That’s why, when faced with midpandemic boredom, in a state where it’s legal to grow (under California law, anyone 21 and older can grow up to six plants for recreational use) and with an unused everything-but-the-seeds kit from A Pot for Pot (purchased while researching The Times’ 2020 holiday cannabis gift guide) lurking in the corner of my home office, I decided to connect with my roots by trying to get a pot plant to put down the same. By following the process from start to finish, I reasoned, I’d be able to better appreciate how those dried little nuggets of instant staycation get from the soil to the dispensary shelf.

So after a few weeks of mourning, I decided to give pot-plant parenting a second try. And this time around, I was determined to spare no expense — potential tax savings be damned. I invested in a bathroom scale so I could weigh the plant between waterings, and when Taylor offhandedly suggested an LED grow light so I could raise my little green girl indoors, I immediately ordered one and cleared a spot in my garage, not far from where my hard-partying friends used to routinely smoke plants like her in the pre-pandemic days.

Growing one cannabis plant indoors

If you don’t get much sunlight in your region, you’ll need stronger indoor lighting. You can use a 250-watt HID light in a dark and enclosed area. However, the fixtures for these are costly. You probably can’t justify the cost of HIDs or LEDs for a single cannabis plant. Unless, of course, this is a trial run, and you plan to cultivate more plants in the future.

During blooming, drop the humidity level to 40-50%. You can keep the temperature at the same level as when the plant was flowering.

Lighting

One handy tactic is to place your plant near a sunlit window. That is if the climate you live in provides enough sunlight during the summer. You can then use a simple fluorescent bulb (CFL’s, T5’s, T8’s) to provide enough light during the night.

After 3-8 weeks, depending on the strain and your preference, your plant will enter the flowering stage. You need to force it into blooming by ensuring it gets 12 hours of consecutive darkness each day. Sativas tend to take longer to bloom. Some can remain in flowering for up to 14 weeks! However, 8-9 weeks is more typical.

Harvesting

However, some experts believe you should allow the buds to cure for up to eight weeks. Others suggest that you get the best cannabis when it is cured for six months! Once the humidity level goes below 65%, you only need to open the jar once a day, or even once every few days.