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black russian seeds

Black Russian Tomato is an excellent choice if you like a more flavoursome fruit. The unique blend of sugar and acid; and the distinctive, complex flavour makes this variety a must have in your garden. Cordon or indeterminate variety. The flavour is similar to that of the Black Krim tomato. The black Krim is a beefsteak variety and the black Russian produces medium sized fruits.

As soon as seedlings are large enough to handle, prick out. Transplant the seedlings into individual small pots, later on they might need to be repotted if the plants are growing quickly and become too large for their post, the good indication of this is when you can see the roots going through the drainage hole of the pots. Make sure the leaves do not overlap. Temperatures during this stage should be 12-20 Celsius.

Medium-large (80-100g), dark mahogany-brown fruits. The colour of the skin darkens in hot weather. A well-known black tomato in many English garden. One of the best tasting black tomato. Usually a few weeks earlier than the red varieties if sown at the same time. When fully ripen you can experience a somewhat smoky and salty flavour. Suitable for outside production and growing in the greenhouse too.

Black russian seeds

It’s best to raise Tomatoes as transplants. Sow Tomato seeds in sterile seed mix 6 to 8 weeks before the danger of frost has passed, water lightly and provide bottom heat. Grow seedlings at 60° to 75°F in a brightly lit, well-ventilated area. (Windowsills are not bright enough; the plant will get leggy and flop over.) Fertilize lightly as needed, increasing the pot size as needed. After the last spring frost, place outdoors for a week to harden off and to introduce to stronger sunlight. Prepare fertile Tomato beds in full sun with lots of compost and/or well-rotted manure. Transplant, burying seedlings deeper than initially grown, incorporating organic fertilizer under each transplant. Support with Tomato cages or tie plants loosely to rough wooden stakes, using soft cloth. Feed occasionally as needed. Keep Tomatoes well-watered by soaking the soil and not the leaves. Harvest when ripe!

Green Means Go
If you’re wondering if your Tomato plants (or any annual crops) are getting the soil fertility they need, keep an eye on the “seed leaves”. This is the first pair of leaves to emerge when a seed sprouts. They remain at the base of the stem as the plant grows. If the seed leaves stay healthy and green, you’re doing something right with the soil in that row. If they are pale, yellow or withered, you need to prepare the soil more carefully next time you plant.

Not-So-Strange Bedfellows
According to the theory of companion planting, Tomatoes and Basil benefit one another when grown in the same plot. Certainly, they cause each other no harm, for we have often interplanted the two in a row, especially when we’re training Tomatoes vertically on strings. There’s plenty of space in between them for bushy Basil plants. After all, they keep excellent company in the kitchen, whether you’re serving fresh Tomatoes strewn with the pungent green Basil leaves or cooking both up into a luscious sauce for pasta. It’s handy to be able to pick the two together. And who knows? Perhaps the Basil‘s strong scent repels insect pests that might otherwise prey on the Tomatoes.

Green Means Go
If you’re wondering if your Tomato plants (or any annual crops) are getting the soil fertility they need, keep an eye on the “seed leaves”. This is the first pair of leaves to emerge when a seed sprouts. They remain at the base of the stem as the plant grows. If the seed leaves stay healthy and green, you’re doing something right with the soil in that row. If they are pale, yellow or withered, you need to prepare the soil more carefully next time you plant.

  • Tomatoes With Character
    Some Tomatoes are glamorous like Elizabeth Taylor–lush, perfect, refined. Brandywines are glamorous like Melina Mercouri or Anna Magnani. Though their flavor is extraordinary, they do not always form perfect circles when sliced. Sometimes the fruits are lumpy, contorted, or deeply cleft, and you end up cutting them into free form chunks. They are perfect tossed with bread in an Italian panzanella salad, where flavor is more important than form. Or in salsa. Or in sandwiches with lots of mayo. Or try this one: toss some chunks of brie in hot, drained pasta, then add oddly shaped pieces of Brandywine Tomatoes. Ah, summer.