Posted on

best soil for growing marijuana outside

Soil, at a basic level, is defined as the topmost layer of earth in which plants grow—it’s a mixture of organic remains, clay, and rock particles. Cannabis plants thrive in soil rich with organic matter, and they need good drainage.

Sandy soil is easy to work, drains well, and warms quickly, but it doesn’t hold nutrients well, especially in rainy environments. You’ll want to dig large holes for your plants and add compost, peat moss, or coco coir, which will help bind the soil together.

Soil and other media for outdoor cannabis growing

Some growers plant in containers on balconies or rooftops that are shielded from view, while some build heavy-gauge wire cages to keep thieves and animals at bay. Whatever you decide, think about how big you want your final plant to be—outdoor cannabis plants can grow to 10 feet tall or even more, depending on how much you let them go.

Low costs

Sandy soils

Silty soil is the ideal growing medium. It’s easy to work, warms quickly, holds moisture, has good drainage, and contains a lot of nutrients. The best silty soil is dark, crumbly loam—it’s fertile and probably won’t need any amending.

Best soil for growing marijuana outside

Give strong consideration to creating a ‘super soil’ for use in your garden. The term ‘super soil’ was first coined by legendary cannabis cultivator Subcool. Sadly, Subcool has passed away since first blessing the cultivation community with his soil recipe. He may be gone, yet his legacy will endure forever via his popular recipe.

Growing cannabis outdoors is a never-ending educational journey. Even the most experienced cannabis cultivators will be quick to tell you how they are always learning and seeking out cultivation information.

Genetics

If you are using a quality super soil, you shouldn’t have to use nutrients. However, if you are not using super soil you will need to use nutrients to feed your cannabis plants. As with indoor cannabis plants, not all nutrient lines are created equal, and more expensive does not necessarily equate to higher quality. Your best bet is to find someone who has already used a nutrient line that they like and copy their feeding strategy. Over time as you become more familiar with your garden’s needs, you can adjust your nutrient strategy accordingly.

Bugs & Disease

Also, containers can be moved as needed, which is necessary to do from time to time. They are also easier when it comes to monitoring moisture. Fiber pots are recommended because they allow the root base to ‘breath’ better compared to plastic pots. The plants will be grown under the sun, so the bigger the container, the better.